AirlinesFeaturedFlying

When will Norwegian Air resume a full transatlantic flight-schedule?

According to the OAG (Official Airline Guide), Norwegian Air is planning to resume a transatlantic flight-schedule starting December 20, 2020, subject to change.

Reservations for the UK flights are available on Norwegian’s reservations-site as this is written. With that, Norwegian would also resume flying its B787 Dreamliner for part of its normal long-haul operations.

If Norwegian succeeds with its comeback plan you should be able to enjoy the low-fares on Norwegian Dreamliners again, on long-haul flights worldwide. Norwegian/YouTube.

Norwegian Air to resume the UK – US transatlantic flight-schedule

Here is Norwegian’s transatlantic winter schedule, as indicated by OAG. Although Norwegian hopes to resume long-haul flights in December, no transatlantic flights, however, are confirmed from the OAG-schedule at this time, until January 2021.

Again, Norwegian’s plans are always subject to change. This is what we know about the confirmed schedule at this time:

All flights originate out of London Gatwick Airport (LGW):

  • Boston (BOS): 1 daily flight (5 weekly 07JAN21 – 27MAR21).
  • Los Angeles (LAX): 9 weekly flights (5 weekly 11JAN21 – 14FEB21).
  • Miami (MIA): 1 daily flight (5 weekly 12JAN21 – 22FEB21).
  • New York (JFK): 3 daily flights (16 weekly 09JAN21 – 27MAR21).
  • Orlando (ORL): 6 weekly flights (3 weekly 11JAN21 – 21FEB21).
  • San Francisco (SFO): 4 weekly flights (3 weekly 19JAN21 – 23FEB21).
  • Tampa (TPA): 3 weekly flights (2 weekly 11JAN21 – 27MAR21).

When did Norwegian initially plan to resume its transatlantic flight-schedule?

Originally, Norwegian Air wasn’t planning to resume transatlantic flights until April of 2021.

The original plan called for gradually working towards a full transatlantic flight-schedule, starting slow.

A resumed full transatlantic route-system would be similar to the flights it flew before the coronavirus pandemic and the airline’s new business plan changes took effect.

However, the airline also made it clear that they intended to adopt a “wait and analyze”-type of approach to their carefully designed “New Norwegian”-plan.

The plan is a carefully designed business plan, designed to bring the airline from the brink of collapse to profit.

Jacob Schram, Norwegian Air CEO, norwegian resume transatlantic flight-schedule
Jacob Schram, Norwegian Air CEO. Norwegian.

When will Norwegian resume its full transatlantic flight schedule?

According to reliable insider information obtained by Captain Jetson, the company is hard at work monitoring the coronavirus restrictions for travel versus destination demands, manpower needs, revenue control, and capacity every day.

The results of the findings will lead to the decision as to which routes to open next and when.

Provided the coronavirus pandemic does not result in a continuous threat to the world well into 2021 it appears that Norwegian Air should be able to stick to its business plan. The plans call for a gradual escalation of worldwide long-haul flying routes again, starting in April of 2021.

What Norwegian must consider

Coronavirus-restrictions and destination demand are two stumbling-blocks that the airline must consider. Otherwise, flying routes with near empty airplanes would doom the airline.

1. Coronavirus restrictions

Coronavirus restrictions for travel are country-related. For example, EU countries are currently banning Americans from entering, due to the increased virus-transmission rate in the U.S.

The UK recently reopened for visitors from the U.S. However, Americans would have to self-quarantine for 14 days.

Norwegian Air’s planned long-haul flight resumption between the UK and the US is a presumption that the UK’s 14-days quarantine requirement will be lifted by then.

The international travel-restrictions, which constantly change, are constantly updated by individual countries and evaluated for roue resumption feasibility by Norwegian Air.

2. Destination demand

Destination demands are monitored using methods such as monitoring how many flight search requests the airline is getting for certain destinations.

For example, transatlantic long-haul U.S. destinations from European cities show promising opportunities for resumed flights if demand-indicators are heavy.

Norwegian Air’s popular transatlantic routes between the U.S. and many European countries include U.S. cities, such as New York, Boston, Orlando, Miami, Tampa, San Francisco, and Los Angeles.

Featured Image: Former Norwegian CEO Bjørn Kjos, the founder of Norwegian Air Shuttle in a Norwegian B787 Dreamliner cockpit. Kjos was a fighter pilot in the Royal Norwegian Air Force. He is also an attorney. Norwegian.

  • Do You Like What You're Reading?

    Get the latest Airline, Aviation & Travel News from CaptainJetson delivered to your mailbox, 100% free.

  • Your email address will be kept safe and sound with our email provider, MailChimp.

Tags
Show More

Related Articles

Back to top button
Close